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“How We Talk About Power”

It blows my mind to listen to the radio and hear Adam Schiff making a case for AG in California. Not that I really care about his political ambitions, but the way the broadcast was scripted. “It’s an attractive position for ambitious democrats, as the last person to hold the seat was Kamala Harris…”

Like, we are reporting on how certain people look at positions of massive power and social importance the way a 19-year-old looks at a paid internship at a tech company. Ambition is one thing, but the Attorney General of California is the type of job people should be ambitious for.

What the news is ‘reporting’ is that Adam Schiff is working on his career moves, but what the broadcast actually says is Nobody cares about the heartless machine that is ruining untold amount of lives other than to use it for their own personal gain, and that’s how it is going to stay, so if you want to consider a life in politics, remember this is how our world works.

The guy hasn’t even announced he wants the job and they’re already talking about what he’ll do after he has it. When we talk about how the idea of privilege gets entrenched in social norms, we need to look at examples like this, where passive notes on the day are actually reinforcing established power. I mean, it’s not like there’s a fucking shortage of things to report on in the world or anything.

Briefly

Colin Smith is an interdisciplinary artist & art director living & working in Los Angeles. His assembly-based work focuses on human nature and its relationship to media, language, time, and systems of control.

For more information, social links, as well as various writings on practice & theory, visit the about page.

To quickly get in touch, e-mail hello@.

Colophon

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